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Articles to 2016-05-26

May 26th, 2016

First the link to this week’s complete list as HTML and as PDF.

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As real data Anagnostou et al.’s results carry more weight than model gaming does. But then carbon dioxide’s warming potential has never been doubted as such. Interestingly the lowest of all the values shown is way above 500 ppm and if that was sufficiently low to start the ice sheet development in Antarctica then in spite of the hysteresis due to ice’s albedo feedback, there’s little reason to assume the same concentration today will melt it all away again.

Articles to 2016-05-21

May 21st, 2016

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I don’t know what it is about psychology and such, but Luby et al. is another classic example of pure junk science. On the unexpected plus side, they do plot data for once, but then their diagrams’ legends have no units and don’t explain, what exactly is shown. What they find is a tiny effect whose significance is statistical only – the whole difference between the extreme ends of the range comes to about a third of the (estimated, no values given) standard deviation and is driven by a few outliers alone. Read the rest of this entry »

Friends or Villains?

May 12th, 2016

Why do archaeologists insist on alienating collectors, when in fact they are the only true allies we have in an apathetic world?

The current issues of The SAA’s Archaeological Record, of Antiquity, of Arch√§ologische Informationen and others carry long and strained discussions about what to do about collectors and local amateur historians. Read the rest of this entry »

Articles to 2016-05-11

May 11th, 2016

First the link to this week’s complete list as HTML and as PDF.

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The more isotope studies developed, the more ambiguous and less meaningful their results became. It seems that Naito et al. have found a new way forward with their analysis of single amino acids instead of bulk collagen.

Articles to 2016-05-02

May 2nd, 2016

Apologies for the prolonged leave of absence – moving house absorbs an inordinate amount of time, but now things are beginning to drift back to normal.

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First the link to this week’s complete list as HTML and as PDF.

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Sex and gender are both purely social concepts and open to free and unconstrained reinterpretation. From reading Vikbladh it seems that the utter nonsense of this idea is finally beginning to dawn on the artsy chattering classes. Read the rest of this entry »

Articles to 2016-04-06

April 6th, 2016

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My short evaluation of Berkowitz 2015 (list of 2015-11-06) was based on the scant information from their article itself. Frank has generously taken on the task of reevaluating their raw data and given us his figure 2, which should have been in there from the start. What we see is a totally amorphous and widely spread data cloud with no discernible trend whatsoever. Of course mathematically, calculating a regression will always yield a result and the slope will never be exactly zero. And of course the more parameters you have, Read the rest of this entry »

Articles to 2016-04-01

April 1st, 2016

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In a striking example of political correctness Mattson more or less verbatim states: “Radiation hormesis has been demonstrated in many experiments, but we refuse to accept it, as that would draw the rug out under the religiously required demonisation of nuclear energy.” Eppur si muove!

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Articles to 2016-03-25

March 25th, 2016

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Looking at the comment by Gilbert et al. and the reply by Anderson et al. I shall disregard both their arguments’ merits and take Gilbert et al.’s most optimistic numbers of 85 % and 66 % at face value. What do they mean? The unspoken and unproven but implicit and generally accepted meaning of “statistical significance” is, that only 5 % of results occur by chance and 95 % (or at least well over 90 %) should be replicable. This holds for the borderline significance of p=0.05. Most studies I read are less than p=0.01 or even p=0.001. So the implicit claim is that at least 99 % of them ought to be successfully reproduced. They aren’t. Something very basic is very much wrong with the results and the reporting in the psychological and sociological sciences.

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Articles to 2016-03-19

March 19th, 2016

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I have seen and commented on many sociological and psychological findings of dubious substance, relevance, and (non-statistical) significance, but Schilke et al. have set a new low. In a reply to comment they seriously cite a correlation of less than r2 = 0.01 to bolster their argument. How many zeroes behind the decimal point do you need before you can call a correlation nonexistent?

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Articles to 2016-03-11

March 11th, 2016

First the link to this week’s complete list as HTML and as PDF.

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It seems the years 1998–2012 have been the driest in the Levant for at least 900 a. And according to Cook et al. it is of course all down to man-made global warming. Let’s look at the details. I can’t fault either their data nor their methodology, both are sound and reported in detail. What we see are the last decades being unexceptional around the Mediterranean, with no serious dry spell since about 1960 (the scale doesn’t help to be more precise). The cyclicity even suggests, we’ve had it good for some time now and a new spell of drought is due. So what we have here is a strong regional anomaly. In general, and there are many examples for this, regional climate is more strongly influenced by local vegetation cover and albedo than by world averages. Read the rest of this entry »